Hasbro Says There Will Be Simplified Designs for ‘Transformers 4: Age of Extinction’ Toys

toy-news-and-talkHasbro showed one of the first (if not the first) Transformers 4: Age of Extinction toys in packaging via the NY Times. The toy is a “Smash & Change” Optimus Prime. This is a simpler Transformers and meant for a younger collector. But according to Hasbro, this is the direction for the brand. Simpler Transformers. Hasbro CEO Brian D. Goldner says that Transformers have lost their magic in recent years and have become too complicated?

So is this the right direction for the brand? I do agree that some Transformers are a bit complicated, but that is almost part of their appeal. Right? Will simplification just be used for the movie line? That has already been the case with other movie lines that Hasbro produces, see Iron Man 3, Wolverine, Thor: The Dark World, or even look at some of Star Wars. Does Hasbro think this is the answer for short attention span children? Or is this just another cost savings measure to increase the profit margin? What do you think? (Source: NY Times)

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  • “Hasbro will continue to make complex Transformers for adult fans who
    have collected the toys since their inception 30 years ago. But the new
    design is intended to re-engage parents and children, who found the
    transformations too challenging.”

    If I buy a new Transformer that’s packaged in robot mode, odds are good it’s never going to see vehicle mode. Nothing about having to spend more than a couple of minutes on that holds any appeal for me, so I can only imagine how frustrating that could be for a parent whose only interest in the toy is changing it for his/her kid.

    • I get that, just sad to see that dumbing down of things is how we cater to children. We should be engaging them, making them think. I know they say they will still cater to the collectors, but for how long?

      • I don’t think it’s “dumbing down” so much as expanding the market to include a younger audience. Some of the more complicated Transformers are great for an eight-year-old, not so much for most four-year-olds.

        • Not sure if I’m reading it like that, but I do hope that you are right though.